About

History

The history of Chennai Customs dates back to 600 AD when the seaport of Mamallapuram flourished under the rule of the Pallava King, Mahendra Varma. It was in Fort St. George that the British first collected Sea Customs duties. Lord Edward Clive who was the Governor of Madras Presidency during 1754-1839 ordered the transfer of the Custom House from Fort St. George to its present site at No.33, Rajaji Salai, Chennai-600 001. It was also during his period that the first legalized Sea Customs Regulation Sec. 2 of Regulation I of 1802 was passed, and then amended as Regulation II of 1803. The first “Collector of Customs” was Mr. Walter Balfour who took Office in the year 1800. Thus the history of the Chennai Customs, reckoning from the recent history, is 2 centuries old.

Vision:-

Partnering in India’s socio-economic growth by formulating and implementing progressive indirect tax policies adopting stakeholder-centric approach and protecting the frontiers.

Mission:-

A robust indirect tax and border control administration, with a view towards delivery of services, which is –

  • Simple and predictable
  • Fair and just
  • Transparent
  • Technology-driven

and which –

  • Encourages trust – based voluntary compliance
  • Protects honest taxpayers’ rights
  • Facilitates trade with risk-based enforcement
  • Enables legitimate movement of people, goods and services.
  •  Supplement the efforts to ensure national security, and;
  • Continually invests in capacity building to achieve professional and ethical excellence.

OUR COMMITMENT:-

We shall strive to:

  • To encourage voluntary compliance
  • To educate citizens about indirect tax laws
  • To continuously enhance service delivery standards
  • To promote a consultative and collaborative environment
  • To provide information and other assistance at the GST Seva Kendras/Facilitation Counters as also on the website www.cbic.gov.in
  • To effectively combat corruption as part of the comprehensive national mission for promotion of integrity.
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